Hull residence, "Langmore", taken from south side of house.

11-Mar-56

View this document at Calgary Public Library: Hull residence, "Langmore", taken from south side of house.

Document Record
Creator Alison Jackson
Title Hull residence, "Langmore", taken from south side of house.
Published 11-Mar-56
Identifier aj_08-03
Rights Copyright Calgary Public Library. 616 Macleod Trail SE, Calgary AB, T2G 2M2, 1+(403)260-2785 hum1@calgarypubliclibrary.com
Document source Alison Jackson Estate
Notes Calgary, Alberta
11-Mar-56
35mm colour slide. Taken with a Praktica camera using Kodachrome daylight film 135.
4137
2720
32990.738 KB
Calgary Public Library, Central Library, Local History Room
Alison Jackson Photograph Collection
Still Image
Media Image
Contributor Calgary Public Library
Description “Cornerstones” were articles that appeared in the Sunday edition of the Calgary Herald between 1997 and 2000. The following article appeared January 18, 1998. <br><br> Hull House (Langmore) <br>• 1202 6 St. W. <br>• Built: 1902 - 1905 <br>• Demolished: 1970 <br>• Architect: Hodgson and Bates of Calgary. <br>• Original cost: $12,000 to build plus $3,000 to furnish. <br>• Original owner: William Roper Hull and his wife Emmeline. William was born in England in 1856. He and his brother started a stock raising business in Kamloops, British Columbia and in 1883 drove 1,200 head of horses over the Crow's Nest Pass to Calgary for sale to the Mounted Police and stock raising companies. Hull quickly became involved in the development of Calgary, establishing a large meat business which he later sold to Pat Burns. Hull built Calgary's first Opera House, the Grain Exchange Building, the Alberta, Victoria and Albion Blocks. The Hull's owned several ranches in the area including the 6,000 acre Oxley Ranch at Willow Creek. At the time of Hull's death April 4, 1925, he was head of the firm W. R. Hull Limited, Ranching, Financing and Insurance Agents. Mrs. Hull was an enthusiastic member of the Colonel Macleod Chapter of the I.O.D.E. and through her efforts the base of the South African War Memorial in Central Park was erected by the Chapter. When Mrs. Hull died March 11, 1953 the estate was valued at over $5 million. Much of it was willed to charity including the funds to build the William Roper Hull Home. (now Child and Family Services) <br>• Construction materials: Brick walls. Sandstone foundation and decorative trim which included quoins, piers, lintels and voussoirs. Red Spanish tile roof. Extensive use of bevelled, leaded and stained glass windows. Wood panelling, beams, flooring and trim throughout the house. <br>• Architectural style: Classical Revival elements combined with English country house features. Two full storeys, an attic and a basement. Built on a square plan. A veranda stretching across the front and much of the south side provided a second storey wrap around balcony. An upper storey balcony spanned the back of the house facing 5th Street. <br><br> Historical highlights: <br>• Langmore, named after the Hull family home in England, was situated on twenty-two city lots (1.7 acres) in one of Calgary's exclusive districts. <br>• When Langmore was completed in 1905 there were only three other homes in the immediate vicinity; the Lougheed house, the home of Peter McCarthy which became the site of the Ranchman's Club and the Braden's home. <br>• The estate was beautifully landscaped and the Hull's became known for elaborate garden parties such as the one held for 400 guests in August of 1913. "Mr. and Mrs. Hull have one of the most beautiful terraced gardens in the city. The afternoon was spent in tennis, croquet and lawn bowling...Bagley's orchestra played very pleasantly. Tea was served from a marquee erected on the lawn." <br>• Following Mrs. Hull's death the entire contents of Langmore was sold at auction in April 1953. Auctioneer Joe Reid, stood on his platform in the garage at the bottom of the spacious gardens east of the house and called for bids on oil and watercolour paintings, crystal decanters, silverware, mounted heads of mountain goats and deer, brass fenders and fire irons, mahogany occasional chairs, a handcarved mahogany Chinese cabinet overlaid with ivory carvings, a surrey with fringe and hand carved hall seat with inlaid mother-of-pearl. <br>• May 1954 the house and property, reported to be worth $150,000, was put up for sale by Royal Trust Company, executors for the Hull estate. <br>• In 1955 Glenbow Ranches bought Langmore and moved the Eric L. Harvie collection of Canadiana into the house. <br>• By 1958 the Glenbow Foundation had outgrown the Hull House. Author Hugh Dempsey recalled that "the archaeology program was run from the carriage house, the mansion's basement was crammed full of paintings and documents, and the billiard room on the third floor was in danger of collapsing because of the weight of the library books." <br>• Eventually the Glenbow moved into larger quarters and the Hull House reverted back to Riveredge ownership, serving as administrative offices for Eric Harvie's Ace and Riveredge Foundations. <br>• Langmore was sold and demolished in 1970 to make way for Hull Estates, a highrise condominium development. <br>• Hull's brick two-carriage coach house was moved to Heritage Park. It included stables for carriage and riding horses, a hayloft, and living quarters for the groomsman. <br><br><br> “Then & Now” columns appeared weekly in the Calgary Herald between 2002 and 2005. The following article appeared September 23, 2003. <br><br> Then: Langmore/Hull House <br>• Calgary rancher and businessman William Roper Hull and his wife, Emmeline, completed Langmore in 1905 at a cost of $12,000. Situated on 22 city blocks (1.7 acres), and designed by Hodgson and Bates of Calgary, the two-storey brick and sandstone residence was built on a square plan combining elements of classical revival with English country house. Langmore, named after the Hull family home in England, featured a red Spanish tile roof, beveled, leaded and stained glass, wood paneling, beams, flooring and trim. The surrounding property was beautifully landscaped and the Hulls became know for elaborate garden parties. Following Emmeline's death in 1953, the contents of Langmore were sold at auction. Two years later, Eric Harvie, owner of Glenbow Ranch and founder of the Glenbow Museum, bought the estate and moved his collection of Canadiana into the house. By 1958, the Glenbow Foundation had outgrown Hull house and moved to larger quarters. <br><br> Now: Hull Estates <br>• Following the departure of the Glenbow, the Hull mansion served as administration offices for Eric Harvie's Ace and Riveredge Foundations. Langmore was sold in 1970 and demolished to make way for Hull Estates, a highrise condominium development. The original brick two-carriage coach house was moved to Heritage Park. It included stables for carriage and riding horses, a hayloft and living quarters for the groomsman.
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