employment of the people and the capital of Great Britain in her own colonies, at the same time assisting emigration and penal arrangements by undertaking a great national work and thus opening the shortest road to the most extensive regions of wealth ever before at the command of any nation in the world (not regions of gold, but for commerce and industry), so that at no future period (within at least the imagination of man) will Great Britain have to complain either of too great a population on her soil, or too small a market for her labour

View this document at University of Alberta: employment of the people and the capital of Great Britain in her own colonies, at the same time assisting emigration and penal arrangements by undertaking a great national work and thus opening the shortest road to the most extensive regions of wealth ever before at the command of any nation in the world (not regions of gold, but for commerce and industry), so that at no future period (within at least the imagination of man) will Great Britain have to complain either of too great a population on her soil, or too small a market for her labour

Document Record
Creator Carmichael-Smyth, Robert Stewart
Title employment of the people and the capital of Great Britain in her own colonies, at the same time assisting emigration and penal arrangements by undertaking a great national work and thus opening the shortest road to the most extensive regions of wealth ever before at the command of any nation in the world (not regions of gold, but for commerce and industry), so that at no future period (within at least the imagination of man) will Great Britain have to complain either of too great a population on her soil, or too small a market for her labour
Identifier P000261
Subject Communications--Pacific Railway
Emigration and immigration
Émigration et immigration
Land settlement
Colonisation intérieure
Letters
Lettres (Genre littéraire)
Prairie Provinces--Economic conditions
Railroads
Chemins de fer
1849
Notes print viii, 68 p., fold. map.; 21.5 cm.
Language English
Media Text
Contributor University of Alberta
Description Cover title: "The employment of the people and capital of Great Britain in her own colonies, explained in a letter from Major Robert Carmichael-Smyth to his friend the author of "The Clockmaker," containing thoughts on the subject of a British colonial railway communication between the Atlantic and the Pacific, at the same time assisting emigration and penal arrangements." Title on two leaves; portion of title on second leaf is: "A letter from Major Robert Carmichael-Smyth to his friend the author of "The Clockmaker" containing thoughts on the subject of a British colonial railway communication between the Atlantic and the Pacific, from the magnificent harbour of Halifax, Nova Scotia (north-western America) to the mouth of Frazer's River, in New Caledonia (north-western America), or such other port as may be determined upon." Also published as <i>The employment of the people and the capital of Great Britain in her own colonies: At the same time assisting emigration, colonization and penal arrangements, by undertaking the construction of a great national railway between the Atlantic and the Pacific, from Halifax harbour, Nova Scotia, to Frazer's River, New Caledonia </i>, London: W.P. Metchim, 1849 (viii, 75p.); as <i>The employment of the people and the capital of Great Britain in her own colonies by undertaking a great national work, and thus opening the shortest road to the most extensive regions of wealth…explained in a letter to the author of "The Clockmaker," containing thoughts on the subject of a railway communication…to the mouth of Frazer's River in New Caledonia (north-western America), or such other port as may be determined upon </i>, London: W.P. Metchim, 1849 (viii, 59p.). "Letter" written to Thomas Chandler Haliburton.
Permanent Link http://search.canadiana.ca/view/aeu.P000261